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White House Considers Postponing Tariffs to Help Businesses: Live Updates – The New York Times

Right NowThe Labor Department released data on last week’s unemployment claims, some of the first hard data on the pandemic’s economic toll.More than three million file unemployment claims, the most ever in a week.ImageAn empty diner in Hasbrouck Heights, N.J.Credit…Bryan Anselm for The New York TimesNearly 3.3 million people filed for unemployment benefits last week,…

John Ellis

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The Labor Department released data on last week’s unemployment claims, some of the first hard data on the pandemic’s economic toll.

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Credit…Bryan Anselm for The New York Times

Nearly 3.3 million people filed for unemployment benefits last week, sending a collective shudder throughout the economy that is unlike anything Americans have experienced.

The numbers, released by the Labor Department on Thursday, are some of the first hard data on the economic toll of the coronavirus pandemic, which has shut down whole swaths of American life faster than government statistics can keep track.

Just three weeks ago, barely 200,000 people applied for jobless benefits, a historically low number. In the half-century that the government has tracked applications, the most applications filed in a single week had been fewer than 700,000.

“In the whole history of initial claims, there’s never been anything remotely close to that,” said Ben Herzon, executive director of IHS Markit, a business data and analytics firm.

As staggering as the figures are, they almost certainly understate the problem. Some part-time and low-wage workers don’t qualify for unemployment benefits. Nor do gig workers, independent contractors and the self-employed, although the emergency aid package being considered by Congress would broaden eligibility. Others who do qualify may not know it. And the sudden rush of layoffs led to jammed phone lines and overwhelmed computer servers at unemployment offices across the country, leaving many people unable to file claims.

The worst could be yet to come. Mr. Herzon said he expected a similarly large number next Thursday, when the Labor Department releases its report on new claims filed this week.

THE AID PLAN

Lawmakers put some restrictions on the compensation of executives whose companies receive government assistance under the bill, in an effort to address one of the criticisms about bailouts of banks and other companies during the 2008 financial crisis. But the limits will not do away with multimillion dollar paydays for corporate bosses.

THE DETAILS Executives who made more than $3 million in 2019 could be awarded $3 million, plus half of any sum in excess of $3 million. As a result, a chief executive who earned $20 million in 2019 would be allowed compensation of $11.5 million, or $3 million plus half of $17 million per year. The restrictions would apply from the time the federal support begins to one year after it ends.

In addition, companies receiving assistance will not be allowed to increase the compensation of executives who earned between $425,000 and $3 million in 2019 until a year after government support ends.

THE CONTEXT Of course, senior executives and their boards of directors could decide on their own to pay themselves far less to show investors, employees and lawmakers that they, too, are making a sacrifice. But those who don’t would effectively have their compensation subsidized by taxpayers, said Sarah Anderson, a project director at the Institute for Policy Studies, a progressive research organization based in Washington.

Jerome H. Powell, the Federal Reserve chair, said during a rare television interview on Thursday that the United States “may well” be in a recession already, but that it should get the coronavirus under control before getting back to work.

“The first order of business will be to get the spread of the virus under control, and then to resume economic activity,” Mr. Powell said, speaking on NBC’s “Today” show. “The virus is going to dictate the timetable here.”

Mr. Powell’s comments contrast those of President Trump, who has suggested that he wants many Americans to get back to work as soon as Easter, less than three weeks away, and that efforts to slow the spread of the virus by shuttering large parts of the economy should not be worse than the disease itself.

U.S. futures pointed lower on Thursday as Labor Department figures revealed a record number of unemployment claims, more evidence of the staggering economic toll of the coronavirus pandemic stacking up.

The number of people who sought jobless benefits last week was staggering — nearly 3.3 million — but had been widely anticipated by investors.

In Europe, stocks were also trading down, even after lawmakers in Washington advanced a highly anticipated $2 trillion rescue package to bolster the American economy.

Major markets lost about 2 percent by midmorning in Europe, after a mixed day of trading in Asia.

Investors had already bid up shares in previous days after the United States began preparing a spending and support plan to help households and companies cope with the coronavirus outbreak. The Senate passed it late on Wednesday, and it was expected to get approval by the House and President Trump shortly after.

But questions remain about the timing of the support plan and whether lawmakers should do even more, and that left investors nervous. Prices for longer-term U.S. Treasury bonds were up, sending yields lower and suggesting investors were looking for safe places to park their money. Oil prices, a proxy for the outlook for the world economy because they indicate demand for fuel, fell on futures markets.

THE AID PLAN

How much money will individuals get — and how will it be distributed? How are unemployment benefits changing? Are gig workers included?

The Senate unanimously passed a $2 trillion economic stimulus plan on Wednesday that will offer assistance to tens of millions of American households affected by the coronavirus. Its components include payments to individuals, expanded unemployment coverage that includes the self-employed, loans for small businesses and nonprofits, temporary changes to withdrawal rules from retirement accounts, and more.

The House of Representatives was expected to quickly take up the bill and pass it, sending it to President Trump for his signature.

We collected answers to common questions about what’s in the bill.

The Trump administration is considering postponing tariff payments on some imported goods for 90 days, according to people familiar with the matter, as it looks to ease the burden on businesses hurt by the coronavirus pandemic.

Some businesses and trade groups have argued that the levies President Trump imposed on foreign metals and products from China before the outbreak continue to raise their costs and weigh on their profits as the economy is slowing sharply. But even after the global pandemic hit the United States, Mr. Trump and his advisers have denied that cutting tariffs would be one of the measures they would undertake to buoy the economy.

The White House now appears to be considering a proposal that would defer tariff duties for three months for importers, though it would not cancel them outright. The administration’s consideration of a deferral was reported earlier by Bloomberg News.

It is not clear which tariffs the deferral might apply to, or if the idea will ultimately be approved. But the proposal appears to be separate from a plan announced on Friday by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection that it would approve delayed payment of duties, taxes and fees on a case-by-case basis.

The coronavirus pandemic sweeping the globe with lethal and wealth-destroying consequences has proved so jarring to the powers-that-be on the European side of the Atlantic that they have discarded deep-set taboos to forge atypically swift and pragmatic responses.

“This pandemic is really like a war,” said Maria Demertzis, an economist and deputy director of Bruegel, a research institution in Brussels. “In a war, you do what you have to do.”

The British prime minister, from the party of Margaret Thatcher, has effectively nationalized the national railway system, while forsaking budget austerity in favor of aggressive public spending. Germany has set aside its traditional detestation for debt to unleash emergency spending, while enabling the rest of the European Union to breach limits on deficits.

The European Central Bank has transcended a legacy often marked by calamitous inaction in the face of crisis to produce something that has frequently seemed impossible: a decisive and timely response.

Beyond the current moment of emergency, some argue that the crisis will be squandered if it does not prompt meaningful change in the structure of economies after life returns to normal. They portray the rescues as an opportunity to transform the nature of the state’s role in the economy.

“It’s about changing the way we do capitalism,” said Mariana Mazzucato, an economist at University College London.

The world is awash in crude oil it doesn’t need, and is slowly running out of places to put it.

The coronavirus pandemic has strangled the world’s economies, silenced factories and grounded airlines, cutting the need for fuel. But Saudi Arabia, the world’s largest producer, is locked in a price war with its rival Russia and is determined to keep raising production.

So storage facilities around the globe are filling up. Huge tankers filled with crude are anchored off coastlines, with no place to go.

“For the first time in history, we are seeing the likelihood that the market will test storage capacity limits within the near future,” said Antoine Halff, a founding partner of Kayrros, a market research firm.

As storage space becomes harder to find, the prices, which have already fallen more than half this year, could drop even further. And companies could be forced to shut off their wells.

On the second day of India’s nationwide lockdown to reduce the spread of the coronavirus, the government announced a relief package of 1.7 trillion rupees, or $22.6 billion, to ease the economic pain that it will cause India’s 1.3 billion residents.

The centerpiece of the plan unveiled on Thursday is an increased ration of free food for the 800 million poorest Indians. The government will give each family an additional 5 kilograms of rice or wheat and 1 kilogram of pulses per person per month for the next three months. The food would supplement existing food allocations poor families already receive.

The most vulnerable people — poor women, farmers, widows, and senior citizens — will also receive small direct cash transfers to their bank accounts.

The extended lockdown is expected to be particularly hard on poor workers, most of whom feed themselves from their day’s earnings. With everyone ordered to stay inside and virtually all businesses closed, these workers no longer have a way to make a living.

For medical workers and others on the front line of the coronavirus response, the government said it would provide 5 million rupees, or about $67,000, of health insurance coverage.

For wealthier workers employed by corporations, the central government will make all the required contributions for the next three months to their state-sponsored retirement accounts.

Reporting was contributed by Vindu Goel, Peter Eavis, Neil Irwin, Tara Siegel Bernard, Ron Lieber, Peter S. Goodman, Patricia Cohen, Ben Casselman, Geneva Abdul, Amie Tsang, Carlos Tejada, Alexandra Stevenson, Su-Hyun Lee and Heather Murphy.

  • Updated March 24, 2020

    • How does coronavirus spread?

      It seems to spread very easily from person to person, especially in homes, hospitals and other confined spaces. The pathogen can be carried on tiny respiratory droplets that fall as they are coughed or sneezed out. It may also be transmitted when we touch a contaminated surface and then touch our face.

    • What makes this outbreak so different?

      Unlike the flu, there is no known treatment or vaccine, and little is known about this particular virus so far. It seems to be more lethal than the flu, but the numbers are still uncertain. And it hits the elderly and those with underlying conditions — not just those with respiratory diseases — particularly hard.

    • What should I do if I feel sick?

      If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus or think you have, and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.

    • What if somebody in my family gets sick?

      If the family member doesn’t need hospitalization and can be cared for at home, you should help him or her with basic needs and monitor the symptoms, while also keeping as much distance as possible, according to guidelines issued by the C.D.C. If there’s space, the sick family member should stay in a separate room and use a separate bathroom. If masks are available, both the sick person and the caregiver should wear them when the caregiver enters the room. Make sure not to share any dishes or other household items and to regularly clean surfaces like counters, doorknobs, toilets and tables. Don’t forget to wash your hands frequently.

    • Should I wear a mask?

      No. Unless you’re already infected, or caring for someone who is, a face mask is not recommended. And stockpiling them will make it harder for nurses and other workers to access the resources they need to help on the front lines.

    • Should I stock up on groceries?

      Plan two weeks of meals if possible. But people should not hoard food or supplies. Despite the empty shelves, the supply chain remains strong. And remember to wipe the handle of the grocery cart with a disinfecting wipe and wash your hands as soon as you get home.

    • Should I pull my money from the markets?

      That’s not a good idea. Even if you’re retired, having a balanced portfolio of stocks and bonds so that your money keeps up with inflation, or even grows, makes sense. But retirees may want to think about having enough cash set aside for a year’s worth of living expenses and big payments needed over the next five years.


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John is the mind behind Newark Now. He initiated this news website because he always wanted to run a website that shares various news bulletins every day. When he was working for some news media company, this idea came to his mind, and then he started it alone. Later, he added a few team members. John is an MBA which gives him an edge over the business industry. Thus, he writes the business-related news bulletins. He has been writing for more than 6 years now, so he has a lot of experience in crafting correct and factual news bulletins in an easy language. Apart from his work, he is a family man. He loves to spend his lots of time with his kids and wife.

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